© 2019 Sunrise Gardens LLC           N2653 County C  Darien, WI 53114     

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The Sunrise Scoop

The Sunrise Scoop- Seasonal Landscaping News and Tips
Our E-Newsletter goes out in early Spring, Summer, and Fall. The latest news and scheduling Seasonal Tips and Reminders ‘Ask Adam’ Questions and Answers Seasonal Services Offered
2017-2018 Newsletters 2017 A New Location for Sunrise Gardens 2018 New OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust Ask Adam - Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake? 2017 - A New Location This year was an eventful one for Sunrise Gardens! It was so eventful that I did not get out the email newsletters. So,  here’s an update everyone with what we've been up to this year. Spring was a little slow to start with the cold wet weather. Adam and the crew finished up the landscaping in front of our home/office, and we celebrated the end of mud and messes after 5 years of major landscaping projects. We now have examples to show customers around the house of what we can do, and fun and functional spaces. In July, we purchased a property to house our growing company. The 27 acre property is a mile and a half down the road from our home/office, and is an abandoned nursery. It came with trees and shrubs that we can harvest, a small building, and plenty of room for landscaping operations. Adam spent time getting the building and yard cleaned up and useable. We will be in full operation there Spring ‘18, and look forward to the new space and efficiencies that come with it. Rachel will be utilizing her Horticulture and Wholesale Nursery experience to help manage the plant production for our landscaping projects.

Industry Changes for 2018

There have been some recent changes in the industry that affect our business including new OSHA regulations, skilled labor shortages, and plant material shortages.

OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust

Silica, also know as quartz, is a very common mineral that is found in many landscaping materials including sand, concrete, masonry, rock, and granite. When building hardscapes such as patios, walkways, and walls, there is often cutting, grinding, and drilling of these materials. This releases dust into the air that contains the tiny crystalline silica particles (100 times smaller than sand) that can cause health hazards when inhaled. Long term silica exposure can cause irreversible and life threatening diseases including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), silicosis (an incurable lung disease) and kidney disease. Last Fall, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) began enforcing a new regulation of respirable levels of crystalline silica for workers. The purpose of the new standard is to reduce the amount of breathable silica dust workers are exposed to. Employers are now required to     limit worker exposure by using engineering controls, such as water or ventilation     limit worker access to high exposure areas     provide respirators when engineering controls can’t adequately limit exposure     offer medical exams to highly exposed workers     develop a written exposure control plan     train workers on silica risks and how to limit exposures     Pay a $12,000 fine per person per exposure if caught by OSHA Responsible companies in the industry have known about the dangers of breathing silica dust for some time, and many of us have already been protecting our crews by using dust control equipment, and other precautions. Although it means higher costs for us, we have no complaints about the regulations, and we are glad that it is being enforced. Many in the industry did not realize the dangers and have been exposing themselves and others to harmful clouds of dust for years. Last year we started using respirators and a powerful vacuum system to limit the dust when cutting. This year we are adding new dust free saws, dust free grinders, and generators to power it all. In some cases, we will be using water for cutting as well. If you see a landscaping company working with saws or grinders surrounded by clouds of dust, not only are they polluting the air and making your home and vehicle dusty, they are also creating hazardous working conditions.

Ask Adam

Q. Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake?   A. We have done many projects on the area lakes over the years, and have a lot of experience in the process. We have a good working relationship with Walworth County, and we are usually able to get the permits needed to do projects on the lakes, as long as we play by the rules. Recently, things have changed, however. Some changes are for the better, and some for the worse, and the permit process has become very complicated. In the Fall of 2016, new regulations were put in place to protect shorelines. Previously, any new structure within 75 ft of the shoreline needed approval, and now it is anything within 300 ft. That means any new structure needs an Engineered Survey of the property, Shoreline Zoning Permit, and complicated Permeability calculations. The good news, though, is that existing structures are still relatively easy to get approval on replacement, as long as the footprint is the same. Any structure (legal or not) that is proven to have been there 10 years or more is grandfathered in, and requires minimal permitting to replace (but not expand). The County Department we work with also lost a key employee, who chose a different career path. This has added to the confusion and slowing of the permitting processes. We usually advise our customers to start the process as early as possible if permits are required. These things can't be rushed, but if you plan ahead it can be done, and the project can be completed within your desired timeframe. Due to the amount of time that it takes to get a permit, we are now charging an hourly rate for this service. If you have any questions, give me a call or email. - Adam
Sunrise Gardens Nursery Yard Pouring concrete pads for bulk storage
© 2019 Sunrise Gardens LLC
Our E-Newsletter goes out in early Spring, Summer, and Fall. The latest news and scheduling Seasonal Tips and Reminders ‘Ask Adam’ Questions and Answers Seasonal Services Offered
N2653 Cty C  Darien, WI 53114    (262) 882-0811     adam@sunrisegardensllc.com
2017-2018 Newsletters 2017 A New Location for Sunrise Gardens 2018 New OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust Ask Adam - Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake? 2017 - A New Location This year was an eventful one for Sunrise Gardens! It was so eventful that I did not get out the email newsletters. So,  here’s an update everyone with what we've been up to this year. Spring was a little slow to start with the cold wet weather. Adam and the crew finished up the landscaping in front of our home/office, and we celebrated the end of mud and messes after 5 years of major landscaping projects. We now have examples to show customers around the house of what we can do, and fun and functional spaces. In July, we purchased a property to house our growing company. The 27 acre property is a mile and a half down the road from our home/office, and is an abandoned nursery. It came with trees and shrubs that we can harvest, a small building, and plenty of room for landscaping operations. Adam spent time getting the building and yard cleaned up and useable. We will be in full operation there Spring ‘18, and look forward to the new space and efficiencies that come with it. Rachel will be utilizing her Horticulture and Wholesale Nursery experience to help manage the plant production for our landscaping projects.

Industry Changes for 2018

There have been some recent changes in the industry that affect our business including new OSHA regulations, skilled labor shortages, and plant material shortages.

OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust

Silica, also know as quartz, is a very common mineral that is found in many landscaping materials including sand, concrete, masonry, rock, and granite. When building hardscapes such as patios, walkways, and walls, there is often cutting, grinding, and drilling of these materials. This releases dust into the air that contains the tiny crystalline silica particles (100 times smaller than sand) that can cause health hazards when inhaled. Long term silica exposure can cause irreversible and life threatening diseases including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), silicosis (an incurable lung disease) and kidney disease. Last Fall, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) began enforcing a new regulation of respirable levels of crystalline silica for workers. The purpose of the new standard is to reduce the amount of breathable silica dust workers are exposed to. Employers are now required to     limit worker exposure by using engineering controls, such as water or ventilation     limit worker access to high exposure areas     provide respirators when engineering controls can’t adequately limit exposure     offer medical exams to highly exposed workers     develop a written exposure control plan     train workers on silica risks and how to limit exposures     Pay a $12,000 fine per person per exposure if caught by OSHA Responsible companies in the industry have known about the dangers of breathing silica dust for some time, and many of us have already been protecting our crews by using dust control equipment, and other precautions. Although it means higher costs for us, we have no complaints about the regulations, and we are glad that it is being enforced. Many in the industry did not realize the dangers and have been exposing themselves and others to harmful clouds of dust for years. Last year we started using respirators and a powerful vacuum system to limit the dust when cutting. This year we are adding new dust free saws, dust free grinders, and generators to power it all. In some cases, we will be using water for cutting as well. If you see a landscaping company working with saws or grinders surrounded by clouds of dust, not only are they polluting the air and making your home and vehicle dusty, they are also creating hazardous working conditions.
Sunrise Gardens Nursery Yard Pouring concrete pads for bulk storage

Ask Adam

Q. Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake?   A. We have done many projects on the area lakes over the years, and have a lot of experience in the process. We have a good working relationship with Walworth County, and we are usually able to get the permits needed to do projects on the lakes, as long as we play by the rules. Recently, things have changed, however. Some changes are for the better, and some for the worse, and the permit process has become very complicated. In the Fall of 2016, new regulations were put in place to protect shorelines. Previously, any new structure within 75 ft of the shoreline needed approval, and now it is anything within 300 ft. That means any new structure needs an Engineered Survey of the property, Shoreline Zoning Permit, and complicated Permeability calculations. The good news, though, is that existing structures are still relatively easy to get approval on replacement, as long as the footprint is the same. Any structure (legal or not) that is proven to have been there 10 years or more is grandfathered in, and requires minimal permitting to replace (but not expand). The County Department we work with also lost a key employee, who chose a different career path. This has added to the confusion and slowing of the permitting processes. We usually advise our customers to start the process as early as possible if permits are required. These things can't be rushed, but if you plan ahead it can be done, and the project can be completed within your desired timeframe. Due to the amount of time that it takes to get a permit, we are now charging an hourly rate for this service. If you have any questions, give me a call or email. - Adam
(262) 882-0811
(262) 882-0811