© 2020 Sunrise Gardens LLC N2653 County C Darien, WI 53114

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The Sunrise Scoop

The Sunrise Scoop- Seasonal Landscaping News and Tips
Our E-Newsletter goes out in early Spring, Summer, and Fall. The latest news and scheduling Seasonal Tips and Reminders ‘Ask Adam’ Questions and Answers Seasonal Services Offered
E-Newsletter Archives
2018 Newsletter New OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust Ask Adam - Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake? 2017 Newsletter A New Location for Sunrise Gardens 2016 E-Newsletter Spring Landscaping Trends - Dogscaping Ask Adam- see on your website, that you are an ICPI Certified Installer. What does that mean? Fall Fireplace vs Firepit Ask Adam - How long will it take for my new perennials to fill in? 2015 E-Newsletter Spring The ROI on Landscaping Ask Adam- A big buck scraped his antlers on my tree this winter. Is there anything I can do, and will it survive? Fall Fall Container Extend your Gardening Season Ask Adam - Why am I seeing so many dead trees around this year? 2014 E-Newsletter Spring Frost Heaving & Winter Damage to Plants Ask Adam - How well do concrete pavers hold up over time? Summer Landscape and Garden Trends - Fire Elements and Edible Landscaping Summer New Plant Care Ask Adam - Why are my yews brown and are they dead? Fall Fall Services Planting Bulbs Ask Adam - How can I avoid getting water in my basement this Winter and next Spring?
2019 What's New at Sunrise Gardens LLC Every year has its own unique challenges, and this year it was definitely the weather. It was a struggle on some projects, and we lost many days to rain, but we had a good team and a good year. We worked on some really neat projects, and worked with some pretty nice (and patient) people. We are looking forward to a productive end of the year, and will continue working on projects until the ground freezes. If temps stay mild, and rain (and snow!) hold off, we can usually work through November. The Farmer's Almanac is predicting a warmer than normal winter with above average moisture. Our fall schedule is pretty much booked, but we can fit in small projects and other fall services (see below) as long as the weather cooperates. Fall is a great time to plan for Spring projects, and we can schedule Landscape Consultations up until snow is on the ground. This winter we will be converting the small building at our location into an office, and hope to have it up and running by next Spring. Enjoy the fall weather and colorful leaves! If you would like to get some ideas for next year, check out our updated Project Gallery online.

Ask Adam

Q. Why are so many retaining walls failing this year? A. This extremely wet year was disaster for many properties in the area. Along with general drainage issues, this year we took numerous calls about failing retaining walls. Retaining walls have the job of holding back soil on a slope that might otherwise erode during rainfalls. This is especially important on shoreline properties. Signs of a retaining wall failing include leaning, cracking or bulging, all of which signal instability and possible future collapse. A failing wall will have to be rebuilt, but the first step is identifying the cause of failure. Below are some of the common causes of retaining wall failure. Poor drainage The number one cause of retaining wall issues is heavy saturated soils that put a strain on the wall if it is not designed to handle that increased weight. If a wall is installed without proper drainage and backfill to get the water out and away, it is doomed to fail, especially after heavy rain events. Unanticipated changes A retaining wall that is built properly should stand for fifty or a hundred years or more without showing signs of failure. However, changes to the land around it that affect pitch, drainage, or weight load can alter the pressure load on the wall. Retaining walls are designed for different weight loads depending on use. If you are changing the use of an area, like adding a parking pad, new structure, or regrading, an older retaining wall will most likely need to be rebuilt and strengthened. Foundation issues Just like any other vertical structure, retaining walls need a solid foundation to avoid shifting and eventual crack or collapse. Properly compaction and base material is crucial. Retaining wall base footing needs to be deep enough to resist the weight of saturated soils and also deeper than the frost line. Poor design There are different types of retaining wall, and there is a time and place for them all. Gravity walls – Dry stacked boulder walls or segmented block walls hold back soil by the weight of the wall material. They gradually step back into the earth to provide more strength and longevity. They are easy to install and are have design flexibility. A compacted gravel base is laid down, and the base blocks are secured. The gravel base is stabilized with a geogrid soil reinforcement to be built to any height. They can fail easily if installed wrong or too small of material is used. Anchored walls – The taller the wall, the more engineering is required for success. Arms, pilings, or anchors are installed deep back and under the hill to stabilize pressure on the wall. s before issues became apparent, but with the new normal of extreme weather coupled with the sloping landscapes of the southern lakes, walls are showing signs of failing within a year of install. If you have a retaining wall that is not doing its job, give us a call, and we can build a bigger, better wall that is installed properly to stand the test of weather and time.
© 2020 Sunrise Gardens LLC
Our E-Newsletter goes out in early Spring, Summer, and Fall. The latest news and scheduling Seasonal Tips and Reminders ‘Ask Adam’ Questions and Answers Seasonal Services Offered
N2653 Cty C Darien, WI 53114 (262) 882-0811 adam@sunrisegardensllc.com

E-Newsletter Archives

2018 Newsletter New OSHA Regulations on Silica Dust Ask Adam - Why is it so difficult to get projects done on the lake? 2017 Newsletter A New Location for Sunrise Gardens 2016 E-Newsletter Spring Landscaping Trends - Dogscaping Ask Adam- see on your website, that you are an ICPI Certified Installer. What does that mean? Fall Fireplace vs Firepit Ask Adam - How long will it take for my new perennials to fill in? 2015 E-Newsletter Spring
The ROI on Landscaping Ask Adam- A big buck scraped his antlers on my tree this winter. Is there anything I can do, and will it survive? Fall Fall Container Extend your Gardening Season Ask Adam - Why am I seeing so many dead trees around this year? 2014 E-Newsletter Spring Frost Heaving & Winter Damage to Plants Ask Adam - How well do concrete pavers hold up over time? Summer Landscape and Garden Trends - Fire Elements and Edible Landscaping Summer New Plant Care Ask Adam - Why are my yews brown and are they dead? Fall Fall Services Planting Bulbs Ask Adam - How can I avoid getting water in my basement this Winter and next Spring?
2019 What's New at Sunrise Gardens LLC Every year has its own unique challenges, and this year it was definitely the weather. It was a struggle on some projects, and we lost many days to rain, but we had a good team and a good year. We worked on some really neat projects, and worked with some pretty nice (and patient) people. We are looking forward to a productive end of the year, and will continue working on projects until the ground freezes. If temps stay mild, and rain (and snow!) hold off, we can usually work through November. The Farmer's Almanac is predicting a warmer than normal winter with above average moisture. Our fall schedule is pretty much booked, but we can fit in small projects and other fall services (see below) as long as the weather cooperates. Fall is a great time to plan for Spring projects, and we can schedule Landscape Consultations up until snow is on the ground. This winter we will be converting the small building at our location into an office, and hope to have it up and running by next Spring. Enjoy the fall weather and colorful leaves! If you would like to get some ideas for next year, check out our updated Project Gallery online.

Ask Adam

Q. Why are so many retaining walls failing this year? A. This extremely wet year was disaster for many properties in the area. Along with general drainage issues, this year we took numerous calls about failing retaining walls. Retaining walls have the job of holding back soil on a slope that might otherwise erode during rainfalls. This is especially important on shoreline properties. Signs of a retaining wall failing include leaning, cracking or bulging, all of which signal instability and possible future collapse. A failing wall will have to be rebuilt, but the first step is identifying the cause of failure. Below are some of the common causes of retaining wall failure. Poor drainage The number one cause of retaining wall issues is heavy saturated soils that put a strain on the wall if it is not designed to handle that increased weight. If a wall is installed without proper drainage and backfill to get the water out and away, it is doomed to fail, especially after heavy rain events. Unanticipated changes A retaining wall that is built properly should stand for fifty or a hundred years or more without showing signs of failure. However, changes to the land around it that affect pitch, drainage, or weight load can alter the pressure load on the wall. Retaining walls are designed for different weight loads depending on use. If you are changing the use of an area, like adding a parking pad, new structure, or regrading, an older retaining wall will most likely need to be rebuilt and strengthened. Foundation issues Just like any other vertical structure, retaining walls need a solid foundation to avoid shifting and eventual crack or collapse. Properly compaction and base material is crucial. Retaining wall base footing needs to be deep enough to resist the weight of saturated soils and also deeper than the frost line. Poor design There are different types of retaining wall, and there is a time and place for them all. Gravity walls – Dry stacked boulder walls or segmented block walls hold back soil by the weight of the wall material. They gradually step back into the earth to provide more strength and longevity. They are easy to install and are have design flexibility. A compacted gravel base is laid down, and the base blocks are secured. The gravel base is stabilized with a geogrid soil reinforcement to be built to any height. They can fail easily if installed wrong or too small of material is used. Anchored walls – The taller the wall, the more engineering is required for success. Arms, pilings, or anchors are installed deep back and under the hill to stabilize pressure on the wall. s before issues became apparent, but with the new normal of extreme weather coupled with the sloping landscapes of the southern lakes, walls are showing signs of failing within a year of install. If you have a retaining wall that is not doing its job, give us a call, and we can build a bigger, better wall that is installed properly to stand the test of weather and time.
(262) 882-0811
(262) 882-0811