Watering Instructions for New Plantings





9-24-2021



Immediately After Planting

Right after planting, we will soak them in to give them a good start. After that it is up to you to keep them alive and well!


Week 1-2 After Planting

Plants will need 1.5-2” of water per week, either from rainfall or watering.

Summer Plantings

Check tree and shrubs every few days for the first two weeks. Perennials should be checked daily, especially during extreme heat and drought.

Spring/Fall Plantings

Check trees and shrubs weekly, perennials 2-3 times per week. Water less if temperatures are cooler.


Week 3 – 12 After Planting

Plants will need 1.5-2” of water per week, either from rainfall or watering.

Summer Plantings Check trees and shrubs weekly, and perennials every 2-3 times per week, especially during extreme heat and drought.

Spring/Fall Plantings

In Fall, cooler temperatures can provide relief, but if it is a dry fall, don’t forget to water if needed. Monitor irrigations systems to avoid overwatering. Water less if temperatures are cooler.






Year 2-3

Plants will need at least 1” of water per week, either from rainfall or watering. Monitor water requirements of new plantings for at least the first two to three years. Keep an eye on plants close to buildings where heat may reflect and plants under roof eaves that may not get as much natural rainfall. During the hot summer months, rainfall can be deceiving. Often, light rain is not enough to get down to the plant roots, or heavy rains mostly run-off the dry soil and contributes little to the ground moisture.


Established Plantings

Plants will need at least 1” of water per week, either from rainfall or watering.


During Drought - Provide more deep watering

Even established plants may need watering to help survive periods of drought in the summer, especially for the first few years as they establish deep roots. Perennial beds can be irrigated with a sprinkler for about an hour to soak the soil. A slow soak for trees and shrubs is best. Turn your hose to about ¼ the flow, and let it drip slow at the base of each plant for 1-2 hours, moving around as needed. This will encourage deep wide roots and a healthier plant.


If fall is dry, or winter doesn’t have much snow, evergreens may need extra water in late fall or early spring. Check your evergreens in November, before the soil freezes, and again in spring when the soil begins to thaw.


How to Check Soil Moisture-

Dig around the root zone with your fingers to a depth of 2-3” for small plants and 6-8” for larger trees.

Is it Dry?

Water Deep and Slow - When the soil feels dry to the touch at that depth, place a hose at the base of the plant, on a heavy trickle. Water for 30-60 seconds for small plants – longer for larger plants (up to an hour each) while moving the hose to a few locations around bigger plants.

Is it Still Moist?

Avoid watering when the soil is moist. Ideally, soil should dry out between watering. As we say “in the biz”, most plants don’t like wet feet. If a plant’s roots are constantly wet, the plant can weaken over time. Plants can die from over watering because of lack of oxygen to their roots or can become susceptible to pests and diseases.


What if I don’t have time to water low and slow?

Watering deep and slow will encourage deep rooting, but if you have to water by hand or are setting up an irrigation system, here is a general amount of water each plant needs at each watering.

Trees – 1-1.5 gallons of water per inch of stem caliper

Shrubs and Perennials – ¼-1/3 of the volume container that was planted (ex. 3 gallon shrub would need .75-1 gallon of water)


When is the best time to water?

Best Time to Water = Early morning (less evaporation)


Mulch is your friend - Mulch allows the most efficient use and retention of the water available.